Cutting up some wood.

I’ve ventured into the woodworking world this school year. I’ve made the effort to go out and outfit the lab with a simple set of woodworking tools, and provide chances for my students to run power tools and make some wood dust.

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I did this with no real project or plan in mind, other than that I knew I wanted to provide more hands-on, mess making madness into my room. In the world of digital fabrication, the lab can become pretty stuck behind screens, but these tools take us back to the roots.

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I started working on some personal projects, to break the tools in and hopefully become inspired to get my students behind the driver’s seat. The tools really make for a pretty productive little workflow, were reasonably inexpensive and are generally safe when used properly.

Project number one came for my 8th graders who were wrapping up their final semester with me in the lab in the middle school. I wanted to make something that they could take with them, represent their time in the middle school. Something with the creative openendedness. The results were laser engraved panels, and simple wooden frames.

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The images were designed in Canva, a simple little graphic / collage tool. It was simple enough to drop the student into, with a high enough ceiling that the students could make something they’d want to keep. The frames were made out of super inexpensive rough spruce furring strips from the big box store.

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Students were given a board long enough to make the frame, and we made the cuts quickly, and safely with the miter saw, clamped to the fence and with stop blocks set up ensuring clean safe cuts. It was easy to set the miter, show the students the cut, and let them jump on. The miter saw is a big, scary tool, but with the material fixed properly, there were no issues.

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Sure, the cheap furring strips were warped pretty good. Some of the miters came out a bit nasty. Gluing up wasn’t easy, because we didn’t have 20 framing clamps, and only a few band clamps. However, just taping the corners was fine, in the end the board was going to be firmly fixed to the frame with brad nails, giving it plenty of strength.

The project was a blast, if a bit messy and lots of work. It was ultimately a great experience for myself to introduce the woodworking tools to my students, and for my students to have the opportunity to get behind these tools. I’m looking forward to doing more of this sort of thing, taking a step back from the high tech and doing things the good old fashioned way with my students.