Experimenting with OnShape

I recently became aware of OnShape during MakerCon coverage on the Make Magazine blog. It looked great. It had alot of the bells and whistles of things like Autodesk Inventor and Solidworks, with sketch based modeling and assemblies. And, it runs in the browser. It looks promising, so I signed up for the beta. Sure enough, only a few hours later, I was given access.

I hadn’t gotten too much time to play with it recently, but I decided to give it a shot today. I wasn’t feeling super inspired to make anything interesting, but I was annoyed about losing whiteboard markers constantly. So, I decided to design a little holster.

firstSketch

 

It has been a long while since I used a more technical 3D CAD tool like this. I find myself banging out little 2D brackets in Inkscape or simple  3D models in 123D Design, or even Tinkercad more often then needing the toolset of something like Solidworks. That being said, I was a bit rusty, but it followed what I expected with my use of Inventor and Solidworks in the past. On the left, I could see a history of my recent actions, organized by sketch and related feature applied to the features.

 

For such an extensive toolset, the interface never felt over complicated or scary. I was quickly able to find my tools based on the icons and just natural placement of tools. It was an intuitive little environment. The speed with which the design rendered changes was pretty satisfying as well. I was worried the bandwidth needed for this sort of app could choke it up with complex features, but it seemed to handle everything with ease.

curaIn about a half an hour, I had the model produced and into Cura, ready to be sliced and printed on the Printrbot Simple Metal. STL Exporting from OnShape wasn’t too obvious, but I figured it out with some Googling and guessing. I was disappointed to find out that there is currently no assembly STL export when I was Googling. It wasn’t something I needed for this model, but it would be one of the reasons I’d turn to this tool in the future if I needed to do a complex assembly.

IMG_3364

Sure enough I messed up three times. First, I made the holes for the markers too small. Then I made the stopper holes too small. Then, the next print messed up with about 5 minutes to go. But, thanks to 3D printing, I was able to print and check and print again quickly.

 

Overall, I am solidly surprised. I didn’t think it would be easy to slam functionality of massive tools like Solidworks into a browser based app, but OnShape seems to do it pretty well. I think that the interface is clever and modern, and it can serve as a great step past 123D Design for students in my classroom. It especially serves as a valuable tool for Chromebook based classrooms that lost 123D Design in the browser not long ago.